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Tuesday
Jul012014


Sunday
Jun292014

Joe Petrosino: The Facts about the 1909 Mafia Murder that Stunned New York 

A braggart has just named one of the celebrated cop’s unknown killers

by Carl Russo

Joe PetrosinoMY FATHER’S UNCLE was named Paolo Palazzotto. He committed the first murder, the first murder, the first policeman killed in Palermo. My uncle killed him. Joe Petrosini, the American policeman who came here to investigate. He arrived from America, and he fucking came here to incarcerate and investigate the Mafia. So they killed him on behalf of Cascio Ferro.”

What sounds like someone ratting out his great-uncle is actually a grand boast by one Domenico Palazzotto to a fellow mobster, caught on police surveillance tape. “We’ve been mafioso for a hundred years!” he says, claiming that in 2009 his family celebrated the centennial of New York cop Joe Petrosino’s assassination, news of which was received as a national calamity in the United States in 1909.

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Saturday
Jun142014

Famiglia Territory: Stille vs. Dickie?

Is there a sibling rivalry over Blood Brothers?

by Carl Russo

John DickieAS AN AMERICAN, I find it hard to get amped up about World Cup 2014. But I have a fantasy bout going between two of my favorite Mafia experts. This weekend’s mob must-read is one great crime writer’s review of another’s book. Alexander Stille (Excellent Cadavers) takes a soft swipe at John Dickie (Cosa Nostra) over his latest book, Blood Brotherhoods: A History of Italy’s Three Mafias. In tomorrow’s New York Times Book Review, Stille writes,

Dickie, in his attempt to give coherence to so much material, makes overly grand claims about the essential unity of Italy’s various crime groups. If he had shortened his book by 20 percent, reduced the rhetorical temperature by 20 degrees and scaled back some of his more ambitious assertions, one would be left with an extremely valuable history of Italian organized crime.

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Saturday
Jun072014

Stop, Thief! A Major Newspaper Steals My Photograph

I regularly credit La Repubblica. Where’s the love?

by Carl Russo

Michele GrecoLA REPUBBLICA, one of Italy's leading national newspapers, stole my photograph for an article about cemetery tourism in that country. Take a look at my image below of Mafia godfather Michele “the Pope” Greco’s gravesite then see how it appears in La Repubblica. Some two-bit photo editor cropped out my blog’s logo! This copyrighted image also appears in my book, The Sicilian Mafia: A True Crime Travel Guide.

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Sunday
Jun012014

Last Days of the Lo Piccolos, part 2

The rise and fall of a father-and-son Mafia team

by Carl Russo

[This two-part article is a prequel to the chapters about the Lo Piccolo crime family in my book, The Sicilian Mafia: A True Crime Travel Guide. Read part one.]

Sandro Lo PiccoloA STRAIGHT LINE can be drawn across metropolitan Palermo starting in the gloomy slums of the San Lorenzo district and ending at the sunny fishing village of Sferracavallo—a cross-section of the Lo Piccolos’ dominion. The delinquent young men recruited from the projects made willing foot soldiers in the rackets that financed Salvatore and Sandro’s extravagant lifestyle.

Everyone along the line paid the Lo Piccolos the pizzo, and not just the small shopkeepers. Protection payments were collected from construction companies, gas stations and discotheques. Drug profits from the bosses’ network of traffickers were laundered through gaming rooms, supermarkets and even state railroad expansion.

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Sunday
Apr062014

Last Days of the Lo Piccolos, part 1

The rise and fall of a father-and-son Mafia team

by Carl Russo

[This two-part article is a prequel to the chapters about the Lo Piccolo crime family in my book, The Sicilian Mafia: A True Crime Travel Guide.

Salvatore Lo PiccoloGASPARE PULIZZI WAS DIGGING at a plate of tortellini with sea bass when a car pulled up to his house. Inside the vehicle were two men, one freshly killed, and Pulizzi was told he’d been assigned to bury the corpse by the bosses responsible for the murder: Salvatore Lo Piccolo and his son Sandro.

The dead man was racketeer Giovanni Bonanno, the son of tough Palermo gangster Armando Bonanno, who had disappeared when Giovanni was just a teen. Now it was Giovanni's turn to vanish, into the soil of a makeshift Mafia graveyard by the freeway a few miles west of Palermo. Pulizzi, following orders, stepped into the car.

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